'Novel Approaches to New Antimicrobials'
GLive - Guildford, 11 February 2020
Complimentary Attendance, Kindly Sponsored by Venner Shipley  
OBN BioTuesday - 'Novel Approaches to New Antimicrobials'
11 February 2020 - GLive, Guildford

Kindly supported by:

Outline:

Antimicrobial resistance is a growing danger to the world’s population, caused predominantly by the overuse of antibiotics in both human health, animal husbandry and agriculture over the past 50 years.  AMR is putting more and more lives at risk, with experts warning of a return to a time where everyday infections become life-threatening, with a potential economic cost of over $1 trillion.

Most of our current antibiotics were originally identified from microbes that live in soil, but due to a critical lack of new antibiotics, academics and researchers or ‘BioProspectors’ are looking for solutions via alternative technologies and environmental sources.

However, going from the test tube to a safe and efficacious drug in a patient is only the beginning of a lengthy and costly drug development process, with companies struggling to leverage the market with a payment model based on high prices and volume sales. Consequently, many organisations are looking instead to achieve results via repurposing existing antimicrobials or the development of novel, disruptive approaches.

During this BioTuesday we will hear from academics, researchers and company leaders who will all share their latest findings and innovative research regarding their vision for the future, including:

  • Phage Therapy - Utilizing bacterial viruses to help infect the bacteria causing infection

  • Electrochemical Therapy (ECT) – used to enhance the ability of antibiotics to eradicate microbes

  • CRISPR engineering – a new way of rapidly identifying antibiotics hidden in common dirt

  • Disrupting the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria – to create a new class of antibiotics, known as OMPTA

  • Small Molecules and Traditional Chinese Medicines – combining small molecules with traditional Chinese medicines can be used to treat bacterial infections

  • Nanocapusles – a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using Nanocapusles made of natural ingredients

  • Deep-sea marine sponges - may hold the key to antibiotic drug resistance as they are one of the most prolific microbial groups to produce natural product

  • Insect-borne microbes – shown to outperform soil bacteria in stopping some of the most common and dangerous antibiotic-resistant pathogens

  • Manuka honey – how sandwiching eight nano-layers of positively/negatively charged layers of manuka honey and polymer to treat infections in the body

  • Fish – the protective coating of young fish contains a bacterium with promising antibiotic activity against known pathogens

 

Outline:

Antimicrobial resistance is a growing danger to the world’s population, caused predominantly by the overuse of antibiotics in both human health, animal husbandry and agriculture over the past 50 years.  AMR is putting more and more lives at risk, with experts warning of a return to a time where everyday infections become life-threatening, with a potential economic cost of over $1 trillion.

Most of our current antibiotics were originally identified from microbes that live in soil, but due to a critical lack of new antibiotics, academics and researchers or ‘BioProspectors’ are looking for solutions via alternative technologies and environmental sources.

However, going from the test tube to a safe and efficacious drug in a patient is only the beginning of a lengthy and costly drug development process, with companies struggling to leverage the market with a payment model based on high prices and volume sales. Consequently, many organisations are looking instead to achieve results via repurposing existing antimicrobials or the development of novel, disruptive approaches.

During this BioTuesday we will hear from academics, researchers and company leaders who will all share their latest findings and innovative research regarding their vision for the future, including:

  • Phage Therapy - Utilizing bacterial viruses to help infect the bacteria causing infection

  • Electrochemical Therapy (ECT) – used to enhance the ability of antibiotics to eradicate microbes

  • CRISPR engineering – a new way of rapidly identifying antibiotics hidden in common dirt

  • Disrupting the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria – to create a new class of antibiotics, known as OMPTA

  • Small Molecules and Traditional Chinese Medicines – combining small molecules with traditional Chinese medicines can be used to treat bacterial infections

  • Nanocapusles – a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using Nanocapusles made of natural ingredients

  • Deep-sea marine sponges - may hold the key to antibiotic drug resistance as they are one of the most prolific microbial groups to produce natural product

  • Insect-borne microbes – shown to outperform soil bacteria in stopping some of the most common and dangerous antibiotic-resistant pathogens

  • Manuka honey – how sandwiching eight nano-layers of positively/negatively charged layers of manuka honey and polymer to treat infections in the body

  • Fish – the protective coating of young fish contains a bacterium with promising antibiotic activity against known pathogens

Programme & Speakers:

17:30   Registration & Networking
18:00   Welcome by OBN & Anton Hutter, Partner - Life Sciences at Venner Shipley
18.05   Keynote - Dr Fiona Marston, Director of the Centre of Excellence in Infectious Diseases Research (CEIDR)
18.20   Research Update - Prof. Roberto La Ragione,
Head of the Department of Pathology and Infectious Diseases, Deputy Head of School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey
18.35   Research Update - Dr Paul Race, School of Biochemistry, University of Bristol
18.50   Research Update - Dr Piergiorgio Gentile, Lead Author & Biomedical Engineer at Newcastle University
19.05   Company presentation - Prof. Monique Simmonds, Director of Polypharmakos and Deputy Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew
19.20  Company presentation -  Helen Harrison, Group Leader, Bicycle Therapeutics
19.30   Company presentation - Dr Heather Fairhead, CEO at Phico Therapeutics
19.40   Company presentation - David Browning, CEO at Fixed Phage
19.50  Company presentation – Paul Ko Ferrigno, Founder of meta
 Linear
20.00   Q&A with all speakers
20.30   Networking drinks
21.00   Evening ends

Venue
This event is being held at 'GLive' London Road, Guildford, GU1 2AA - Click here for more details

 

Tickets
Tickets for this regional BioTuesday event are complimentary.
 
Registration

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